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Announcing the Best of OpenGov Award Recipients!

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It’s that time of year. Prepare for an avalanche of awards and trends as people across industries prepare for 2017. The Best of OpenGov Award, however, is unique. It recognizes local governments that have gone above and beyond to innovate and improve government operations. Better government operations produce better outcomes for citizens, which in turn builds public trust.

We are excited to announce the winners:

Internal Reporting

OpenGov for management reporting helps public agencies streamline their operations. From tracking departmental spending against the budget to monitoring 311 requests, governments use OpenGov to execute on key strategic goals. This year, our winners are:

First Place: Capitola, CA

Runner Up: Rosehill, KS

Transparency and Open Data

Citizens expect their governments to provide easy, intuitive access to financial and performance information. These governments have gone above and beyond in their OpenGov portals. From robust Saved Views to active promotion, these agencies show their dedication to open government. We’re proud to work with them:

First Place: Menlo Park City School District, CA

Runner Up: Capitola, CA

Click here to see Menlo Park City School District’s Transparency Portal and click here to see Capitola’s portal.

Unique Use Cases

Many governments go above and beyond with their OpenGov sites. We’re excited to announce the winners for unique OpenGov use cases:

First Place: St. Petersburg, FL

Use Case: Annual Debt Schedules Report- Finance uses the report throughout the year to download the most recent annual debt schedule to perform analysis when issuing new debt, review budget transfer appropriations needed, create ad hoc reports for City Council, and provide auditors with annual debt service schedules.

Runner Up: Edgewood, KY

Use Case: Stealth Speed Survey – This report is used by Police Officers, the City Administrator, elected officials, and citizens. When residents complain about speeding on a street, the city collects this data to determine if the complaint is valid and supported by actual data. Edgewood also uses this data internally to assign extra traffic controls to Police Officers.